Mar

25

BoatingWinnebagoLogoSilverPirateI think it has become obvious that I personally do not have the time or dedication to properly take care of this site anymore.  I no longer have a boat.  Other hobbies and life activities occupy my time now.

I’ve come to a tough decision but I think its the right one.  It’s time for me to sell the site or hand over the promotional reigns of the site to a new person or group of persons.  I’m doing this so that the site can again flourish and be the best resource for information for the Lake Winnebago boating community.  Which has always been the mission.

I am offering the site for outright sale or on a free lease.

If there is a person or group of people that would like to promote and drive traffic to the site while I still maintain the back end and hosting I’m good with that.  The lease would be free as long as the site is being promoted and stays active and it does not turn into a profit generating business.  Think of this as more of a community service type agreement.  If good faith is show over a couple boating seasons by said leaser to keep the site free and open, I would be inclined to transfer the domain name etc to them for a very very small price.  The spirit of the site has always been to be free and by the boaters for the boaters, it means more to me to keep that dream alive than to get any type of a paycheck out of this.   (Something I have never taken from the ownership of this site.)

If there is a person or business that is interested in an outright purchase, you will get the following:
The BoatingWinnebago.com domain name.
The Wordpess and SMF website and databases for moving to new hosting.
Facebook page with almost 1000 likes
twitter account and youtube channel.
All promotional materials I have.
Once you own the domain name, it is yours to do with as you please but I’ll be very selective and want to know your intentions.

Even with the reduction in activity the site still is #1 ranked site in most major search engines for boating on lake Winnebago and is consistently in the top 10 for just about any search related to lake Winnebago.  That is not by accident.

If you are interested in the site, please send an email to Webmaster@BoatingWinnebago.com or use the contact form here:  http://www.boatingwinnebago.com/contact/

If there is no interest I will be shutting down the site, but will still register the domain name for the foreseeable future to avoid any online domain wholesale places getting a hold of it.

Thank You,

Corey Mielke

Sep

30

It has been my absolute pleasure serving this community since its creation in Feb. of 2010.  Due to inactivity, time constraints and costs, the forums here at www.BoatingWinnebago.com have been set to a “read only,” state.

The site has always been by the boaters for the boaters and we wanted to insure that there was a place to continue to have the Boating Community come together.

A Facebook Group seemed like the best option as we can have multiple admins and everyone can post / discuss things in a common fairly well known interface.

These forums will remain online until further notice.  There is a wealth of knowledge here on many different subjects.  Feel free to use the search function and link back to it as a reference source at your leisure.

If anyone here would like their user account deleted you are able to do that from the Profile area.

Here is the link to the Facebook Group:  https://www.facebook.com/groups/BoatingOnLakeWinnebago

ENJOY!

 

 

Mar

31

Brett Lobajeski’s effort to help save his brother’s truck Sunday, cost him his own vehicle.

Lobajeski said he saw his brother, Robert, break through the ice near Clarence’s Harbor at the south end of Lake Winnebago, and returned to try to help him. But his front tires also broke through the ice about 100 feet from his brother’s vehicle.

Robert Lobajeski’s truck was bridged above the water by its plow and rear bumper.

“We were finished riding (motorcycles) for the day and I was out picking up the cones to get them back on the truck,” Robert Lobajeski said. “I just drove off the track and my truck sunk. I sat there stuck and I had him come out and to try and pull me out real quick. He just did a U-turn and his truck got stuck.”

The two brothers were assisted by snowmobilers on the ice and rescue personnel included members of the Otter Street fishing club who were on the lake removing ramps Sunday. The trucks weren’t far from recommended driving paths, but weather that was in the 50s appeared to have caused ice in the area to soften and become fragile.

Snowmobilers, ATVs and other trucks were also operating in the vicinity at the time the Lobajeskis’ vehicles became trapped.

“He crawled through the window, but mine wasn’t down far enough where I couldn’t get out,” Robert Lobajeski said. “I wasn’t scared at all.”

About about two hours after the brothers escaped from the trucks, the front end of Brett Lobajeski’s vehicle slipped under the water as crews attempted to pull it from the hole.

Brett Lobajeski said that his vehicle, which he uses to drive to work, is unlikely to function.

At about 5 p.m., Robert Lobajeski’s vehicle still remained above water.

Contact Carlos Munoz at cmunoz@gannett.com or (920) 907-7921; Twitter @ReadCarlos.

2 trucks fall through ice on south end of Lake Winnebago | Action Reporter Media | fdlreporter.com.

Feb

14

NEENAH — A 56-year-old Menasha man avoided injury Sunday after his vehicle rolled multiple times on Lake Winnebago.

The man was driving about 1,500 feet from Paynes Point Road south of Neenah around 3:30 p.m. when his sports utility vehicle struck a snow bank and overturned, according to the Wisconsin State Patrol.

While checking the driver for injuries, the Wisconsin State Patrol trooper noticed an odor of intoxicants. After the driver refused any medical treatment, the Trooper administered Standard Field Sobriety Tests to the driver who was subsequently
arrested on suspicion of pperating while intoxicated – third offense.

The OWI is being handled by the Wisconsin State Patrol while the crash is being investigated by the Winnebago County Sheriff’s Department.

 

Driver cited for 3rd OWI following crash on Lake Winnebago | Fond du Lac Reporter | fdlreporter.com.

Dec

27

A 23-year-old man was arrested for drunken driving early Friday morning after his vehicle got stuck in a snowbank.

The man, who is from the Oshkosh area, was driving on Lake Winnebago near Lakeshore Drive when his vehicle became stuck in a snowbank. A caller on shore reported the man to authorities, said Winnebago Sheriff’s Lt. Gordon Ledioyt.

The man was not injured, but he was arrested for his first drunken driving offense.

Deputies from the sheriff’s office made one other drunken driving arrest between Thursday at 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. Friday, Ledioyt said.

The sheriff’s office also responded to a report of a car that fell into a crack on Lake Winnebago near Ceape Avenue, Ledioyt said.

The driver was not there, but Ledioyt said authorities do not believe they are in any danger and are trying to locate them. The vehicle was removed by a local wrecking company.

via Driver arrested for OWI after vehicle gets stuck in snowbank | Northwestern Media | thenorthwestern.com.

Dec

20

A park bench, bicycles,lily pads, rocks and other items are being found in the muck of Lakeside Park lagoons as a dredging project continues.

About 1½ miles of tubes are transporting water, liquified mud and other ground items from the lagoons to an area on the west end of the park property.

About 60 residents turned out for a meeting Tuesday afternoon at the Lakeside Park Pavilion that provided an update on the project. Fond du Lac Public Works Director Jordan Skiff, City Engineer Paul De Vries and Kent Petersen, owner of PCI Dredging based in Minocqua, were on hand to explain the work.

“This has been a good project,” Petersen said, adding that the park setting without houses at the banks has made it easier to maneuver equipment.

Hydraulic dredging involves use of barges with claw-like arms that dig the material and send it in pipes to an area where water and solids are separated.

The first phase of work is nearly complete. Crews have been working around the clock in an area south of the Promen Drive bridge. That area was nearly clogged with sediment washing in from Lake Winnebago.

PCI Dredging plans to shut operations down after this week. Work is likely to resume in March with completion scheduled for May.

“The cold weather is a challenge,” Petersen said. “We’ve proven we can work in minus-7 (degrees).”

Petersen showed residents jars of clay balls and rocks that clog equipment on a regular basis. He said the machines pump about 2,500 to 3,000 gallons of diluted material a minute.

The dredged material is being stored in an open pit at Lakeside West. Residents are asked to stay away from the storage area.

Lakeside Park dredging project shuts down soon story, video | Action Reporter Media | fdlreporter.com.

Dec

16

A 33-year-old man was snowmobiling with his brother, when he hit an ice shove and disappeared.

Heavy winds and snow made the search difficult, as white-out conditions were created.

Eventually, a DNR plane found the man, and he was rescued about two hours after the initial crash.

“The cold is a severe problem, but the wind and blowing of snow caused visibility issues and we had difficulty getting people up to the person,” said Mark Ott, Calumet County Sheriff.

Authorities say alcohol was not a factor in the accident.

The man, whose name has not been released, is being treated for hypothermia.

Snowmobiler rescued from Lake Winnebago | News – Channel3000.com.

Dec

3

OSHKOSH – There’s barely any snow on the ground, but ice fishing has already started on Lake Winnebago waters.

“Looked like a good day to be fishing. Thought I’d give her a try. Didn’t do a whole lot, but it beat working,” said Larry Kissinger, an Oshkosh resident.

This isn’t the earliest start we’ve seen, but is a departure from recent history, according to Don Herman, who’s been checking ice depths for local anglers for years.

“Actually in the last 10 years, this is pretty early. Normally it’s been the third week of December, last week of December, something like that. I’ve already seen it where during deer hunting they’ve been out, but this is kind of early this year,” said Herman with Otter Street Fishing Club.

In more sheltered lakes and back bays, the ice is already thick enough to walk on.

At Asylum Bay near Oshkosh, it was about four inches thick across most of the bay – the minimum thickness to be considered safe to walk on.

On some of these bays, the water isn’t too deep. So even if you go through the ice, you won’t go in too far.

But the risk is even greater in places like the Fox River and Green Bay.

We couldn’t find any anglers out just yet, and the Coast Guard says that’s probably for the better.

“I wouldn’t. I wouldn’t recommend that at all yet. A lot of the ice that’s forming is very suspect and thin,” according to Wayne Spritka, senior chief with the Sturgeon Bay Coast Guard.

In fact, they say it’s probably best to think twice about the ice anywhere you go this early in the year.

Even though the best fishing can be early in the season, no fish is worth a life.

Nov

25

The date was Nov. 14, 1813. British Colonel Robert Dickson arrived on Lake Winnebago’s Garlic Island, and established an encampment with his group of 27 fighting men. Dickson’s goal as an “Indian Agent” for the British in the War of 1812 was to recruit the support of Native Americans against the Americans in the battle that basically was over the fur trade. Dickson’s goal was to use gifts and merchandise to gain support with tribes located in the corridor from Green Bay to Prairie du Chien.

Weather conditions prevented this group from completing their travel to Prairie du Chien that cold November, so Dickson and his troops set up camp on Garlic Island. Nearby on the mainland was a Menominee village that soon became reliant on Colonel Dickson for goods and supplies.

As winter pressed on, conditions became more difficult. Supplies from Green Bay were not able to get through, creating a serious situation for Dickson, his men and the local Menominee’s. “Although Dickson and his men were themselves often on the edge of starvation, both his natural humanity and strategic considerations compelled him to feed the Indians as well as he was able” (source: Illinois in the War of 1812).

Letters from Colonel Dickson to his lieutenants and others describe the rapidly deteriorating conditions. On March 15 he wrote, “…I am heartily sick and tired of this place. There is no situation more miserable than to see objects around you dying with hunger, and unable to give them but little assistance. I have done what I can for them, and will in consequence starve myself. With best wishes. Yours truly, R. Dickson” (source: Garlic Island War Letters, 1813-1814, Colonel Robert Dickson).

It was soon after, provisions arrived as spring allowed travel routes to become more accessible. Dickson and his men eventually continued their trek southward.

The result of the War of 1812 as stipulated in the Treaty of Ghent is that American forces prevailed.

Here, on Nov. 14, 2013, the 200th Anniversary of the arrival of Colonel Dickson, a few local citizens joined the Winnebago County Historical and Archaeological Society to commemorate this historic occasion on Garlic Island. On hand for the dedication was Richard Keene of Neenah, Archaeologist Richard Mason of Neenah and Randy Domer of the Winnebago County Historical and Archaeological Society. Two flags were hoisted onto the flagpole located near the waters edge. First, the American flag followed by the British flag. The flags were raised by Keene and Mason, followed by a commemoration read by Domer.

Historic Garlic Island is located on Lake Winnebago near its west shoreline, north of Asylum Bay between Oshkosh and Neenah.

via Garlic Island celebrates bicentennial | Post-Crescent Media | postcrescent.com.

Nov

11

MENASHA- Special recognition for friends and family of a man who met his untimely death on Lake Winnebago: The tragedy on the ice spurred an effort to help Neenah-Menasha Fire Rescue start its own dive team.

It was a frantic scene on Lake Winnebago off Waverly Beach.

On February 19, 2011, Bruce Peterson’s truck went through the ice.

Neenah-Menasha Fire Rescue responded, but had no dive team to go in after the 58-year-old.

Peterson didn’t make it out alive.

“We miss him dearly,” said Jeanne Schiesser, Peterson’s sister.

Shortly after the tragic drowning, Neenah-Menasha firefighters decided to raise funds for a dive team.

Those close to Peterson took the lead, and had great success raising most of the money.

Monday night, city officials took note of those efforts.

The mayor and council officially presented them with a proclamation.

“Thanks will never be able to convey how we feel with what they did. they really are the heroes in putting this together,” said Assistant Fire Chief Mike Sippin.

Those who were on the scene the day of Peterson’s death say his family and friends have provided the department with a wonderful gift.

One that allows it to be more prepared.

“We could see the hole where the truck had gone down and we knew that there was really nothing we could do. It was a pretty helpless and empty feeling,” said Firefighter Troy Janz.

It took a frenzy of fundraisers, but the group quickly raised 60 thousand dollars towards the 90 thousand the department needed.

“Right away, everybody said absolutely. We’ll do what we can to help so no one else loses a loved one,” said Diane Kiesow, Peterson’s partner.

“I wanted to do something to try to make some sense of the loss that we had,” said Debbie Becklund, Peterson’s friend.

By late 2011, enough was raised to purchase equipment and train divers. The team is now in service.

Peterson’s sister says she’s proud of the work accomplished, and feels so would her brother.

“He would be proud, but he wouldn’t like all the hoo-ha at all,” said Scheisser.

But by turning a tragedy into a community asset, Peterson’s loved ones are making a difference.

“It’s been a long journey, but very fulfilling,” said Becklund.

“Even if we can save one person, it’s all worth it because anyone that needs help, we can help them now,” said Kiesow.

Donations continue to be accepted to help defray maintenance and future training costs.

Dive team started in honor of ice victim.